Thursday, 7 December 2017

Micro Post; Chulgi Chudan Hyung applications

Samir Berardo has been a long time friend to this blog (and me) going back a few years now. How time flies.... Well anyway, I have been trading mails and facebook messages with him for several years now and I have been lucky enough to get to see his work. You see, Samir is very passionate about applications of Karate forms and since Taekwondo is Karate based (yup I am not sugarcoating it) I have taken great interest in his work. He has a very indepth and unique approach to forms applications which has influenced me and given me a whole new benchmark to measure up against. He has waited to make his work public for various reasons, but lately after a seminar with Jesse Enkamp (Yeah, THE Karatebyjesse.com Jesse) he was encouraged by Jesse to make it public. The result (well the first public glimpse) of his work is just scratching the surface of his method, but loads and loads can be learned from the clip I am about to share. He is demonstrating the Naihanchi Kata, which to us KMA practisioners would be Naebojin/ Kima/ Chulgi Chudan Hyung. Po Eun Tul practised in ITF or Chang Hon based Taekwondo styles is partly based on this form (along with the two other Karate forms), and you can see all the techniques scattered around the various Kukki Taekwondo Poomsae. The good news is that now that he is making his work public, I can stop holding back on the applications (Yup, I have sooooo much more in store) which has been directly influenced by his approach. I will wait to he shares more material though :-) My stuff is childs play when compared to his work though so I am sure you will enjoy the clip:-) So without further adu I give you: Samir Berardo:




Wednesday, 20 September 2017

You are most likely using "boonhae" wrong...

(This is a short rant, and not exactly a serious article)

In Taekwondo we use Korean terminology eventhough the art is practised world wide. Some terminology is very well known, other terminology is rather obscure. Poomsae, Chagi, Jireugi, Makki etc are very well known, as well as Mudo, Do, Ho Sin Sul, Taegeuk etc. The above examples ranges from technical to theoretical terminology. When it comes to forms interpretation and especially application of forms many default to the use of Boonhae, or sometimes Hae Sul. I have even seen Boonhae Hae Sul as a term used for application. This usage which is often wrongly used can be traced back to one single person and that person is none other than my friend Stuart Anslow.

Friday, 23 June 2017

Micro post: What's the point of stances

Again, not an in-depth post or anything, I just found a few photos on my phone the other day stemming from an article that was never written (that happens), and thought I could use them to provide hopefully good content for you :-) Stances are often viewed to be unrealistic and many never give them much thought when looking at the postures within Poomsae. They could however, have an important part of your application if you chose to look closer. I've picked this up from both Mu Duk Kwan practisioner, a Keysi seminar, but the man who has opened up my eyes for their true potential is Samir, an incredibly knowledgeable guy who specializes in Okinawan Karate. The examples in this photo are simply a taste, but they are functional and can open up a wide range of possibilities. That being said there are countless other ways to use stances than the ones here. On the left you'll see apkoobi being used to crash into the opponent and take out his structure. On the right you'll see a stance being used to trip the opponent. Both are amplifying the hand techniques being used.


Monday, 19 June 2017

Micro Post; Application from Hansu Poomsae

Hi there:-) I'll try to publish a little more often than I have lately, but some posts will be labelled micro posts. These will be quick and to the point. This time I'd like to share an application (응용) to Hansu Poomsae pyojeok arae makki  (target low block) where you block into your hand so it clamps around your wrist. It's an unusual technique and many never learn it but it's often puzzling for those who do learn it.

Wednesday, 14 June 2017

Taekwondo and jointlocks; a historical journey 1920-2006

Image Source: Self Defense Karate
Henry Cho, 1969
One thing that should not come as a suprise if you follow this blog is that 1: Taekwondo contains joint locks and has had them since long before modern Taekwondo got its name. 2: I prefer to keep my terminology Korean for consistancy. I recently read an excellent post on applications for a single technique in an ITF or Chang Hon Ryu form where one of his applications was named a "kotegaeshi"  (Outward wrist throw/lock). I advice you to follow that blog even if you do not train Chang Hon Ryu because the writer does a great job and there is a lot of overlap between the "different" Taekwondo/Taekwon-Do.

I have been working really hard lately so I have experienced something of a writers block, but the issue gave me an idea for a post, namely; Looking into some of the basic Taekwondo locks and their terminology, their place within Taekwondo etc. This derailed quickly into a historical jurney to demonstrate the fact that Taekwondo has always included joint locks and grappling from its root arts to present day. If you have heard that Taekwondo contains no grappling of any kind and that all grappling taught in Taekwondo today is a direct influence from say Hapkido then I strongly suggest that you take my hand and go on a little journey with me :-D



Monday, 15 May 2017

Is Keumgang a basic form?

Reading through an online discussion on an old forum the other day I came across question regarding
Palgwae Poomsae or rather who still teaches them. It was an old thread, but one of the first replies came from a 6th Dan school owner who said and I am slightly paraphrasing here:

"We teach Taegeuk and Koryo to black belt level, and then have everyone learn Palgwe 1-8 along with Keumgang for their 2nd Dan. Keumgang is such a basic form to study at that level so they need the additional material".

I am all for perserving history, and allthough I have never formally studdied the Palgwae set, I do see their appeal, and they also represent the first form set made by most of the all Kwan. I used to want to study them, but the more I studied the Taegeuk and all the Judanja (Black belt forms) I was given in Korea, plus now my teachers own creation (Soak Am Ryu Poomsae) and some of the old Kwan forms (most noteably Chulgi Chudan Hyung, Won (Original) Koryo Hyung and Ban Wol Hyung) I have more than enough for a lifetime study. I still might do it one day, but I do not yearn it like I used to do, back when I was a real and truly a forms collector. But how someone can say that Keumgang Poomsae is so basic that it is taught almost as an afterthought is beyond me.


Friday, 5 May 2017

Taekwondo "Blocks"

This will be a post that focuses on the application(s) of Taekwondo "Makki-techniques". Makki is a
Korean word that is usually translated into "block" in English. Makki being "block" is a valid translation so I will not say that it is a mistaken translation, but it is a simplified one. If you look closer on the Korean word you will get more translations, and you can look at an older blog post of mine where I did examine the word Makki and its root word Makda. In my view Makki should be translated into "defensive technique" instead of simply "block". Being defensive does not mean that you are simply lifting your arm into position to create an obstacle between you and the attacking limb (this is what you might picture in your head when reading the word "block"). Neither does "defensive technique" stop at merely swapping the attacking limb away as in a "parry". Defensive technique in this case relates to something you do to your opponent so that you receive, redirect or in any other way hinder an attack while gaining an advantageous position. This can be, but is not limited to: parries, blocks, checks, locks, pre-emptive strikes, various limb control techniques etc. This view is supported by the applications to "makki-techniques" in the Kukkiwon textbook where on at least two different occasions "blocks" are applied as joint locks!